Dating 50 years old


18-Sep-2017 11:37

Radiometric dating is based on the decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes that occur naturally in rocks and minerals.These parent isotopes decay to stable daughter isotopes at rates that can be measured experimentally and are effectively constant over time regardless of physical or chemical conditions.Bishop James Ussher, a 17th-century Irish cleric, for example, calculated that creation occurred in 4004 B. There were many other such estimates, but they invariably resulted in an Earth only a few thousand years old.By the late 18th century, some naturalists had begun to look closely at the ancient rocks of the Earth.These are also the methods most commonly criticized by creation “scientists.” For additional information on these methods or on methods not covered here, the reader is referred to the books by Faul (47), Dalrymple and Lanphere (35), Doe (38), York and Farquhar (136), Faure and Powell (50), Faure (49), and Jager and Hunziker (70), as well as the article by Dalrymple (32).The K-Ar method is probably the most widely used radiometric dating technique available to geologists.The main point is that the ages of rock formations are rarely based on a single, isolated age measurement.On the contrary, radiometric ages are verified whenever possible and practical, and are evaluated by considering other relevant data.

Comparing these rocks with the products of present erosion, sedimentation, and earth movements, these earliest geologists soon concluded that the time required to form and sculpt the present Earth was immeasurably longer than had previously been thought.My purpose here is not to review and discuss all of the dating methods in use.



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